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Women's History Month | Week Three

In 1927 five women brought a case to the Supreme Court of Canada to establish the right of women to be appointed to the Senate. These women were Emily Murphy, Henrietta Muir Edwards, Nellie McClung, Louise Crummy McKinney, and Irene Parlby. At the time women were not legally recognized as “persons” and could be denied rights based on narrow interpretations of the law. In fact, while some women in Canada gained the right to vote in 1916, many women — particularly women of colour — did not. By 1960, all women in Canada won the right to vote.

In recognition of the “Famous Five” bringing this case to the SCC, we have chosen five of our women authors to spotlight for Women’s History Month. These authors produce award-winning writing we love to read, and we’ve included some of their reviews and interviews as well.

Here’s a brief book list for our “Famous Five” interpretation:

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These are not the potatoes of my youth 101

Happy publishing day to Matthew Walsh and their poetry collection These are not the potatoes of my youth. This collection takes a long, hard look at what queer means to them and how the world has shaped them, set against the backdrop of their grandfather’s potato garden.

We at Goose Lane Editions wanted to take some time to showcase this amazing debut and we’ve planted a few recent seeds we found online which compliment this impressive crop of poetry.

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Women's History Month | Week Two

In 1927 five women brought a case to the Supreme Court of Canada to establish the right of women to be appointed to the Senate. These women were Emily Murphy, Henrietta Muir Edwards, Nellie McClung, Louise Crummy McKinney, and Irene Parlby. At the time women were not legally recognized as “persons” and could be denied rights based on narrow interpretations of the law. In fact, while some women in Canada gained the right to vote in 1916, many women — particularly women of colour — did not. By 1960, all women in Canada won the right to vote.

In recognition of the “Famous Five” bringing this case to the SCC, we have chosen five of our women authors to spotlight for Women’s History Month. These authors produce award-winning writing we love to read, and we’ve included some of their reviews and interviews as well.

Read more →

How to giftwrap Amy Spurway's gift to readers

As a book designer I spend my time crafting solutions to design and marketing challenges. On the best days, I make people really happy.

So how does one package an author's gift to the world? Read, muse, confer, consult, research, draft, scratch that, and that... revisit, reconsider, read some more, muse some more, confer some more...

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Women's History Month | Week One

In 1927 five women brought a case to the Supreme Court of Canada to establish the right of women to be appointed to the Senate. These women were Emily Murphy, Henrietta Muir Edwards, Nellie McClung, Louise Crummy McKinney, and Irene Parlby. At the time women were not legally recognized as “persons” and could be denied rights based on narrow interpretations of the law. In fact, while some women in Canada gained the right to vote in 1916, many women — particularly women of colour — did not. By 1960, all women in Canada won the right to vote.

In recognition of the “Famous Five” bringing this case to the SCC, we have chosen five of our women authors to spotlight for Women’s History Month. These authors produce award-winning writing we love to read, and we’ve included some of their reviews and interviews as well.

 

Read more →