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Who's Reading What? with Michelle Butler Hallett

One glimpse at Anton's eyes, and I fell in love. That's all it took. I knew him only by reputation; his eyes worked the rest — intrigued me, charmed me. Of course, I'm married, and he's, well, dead, so no tryst. Still, the eyes of Dr Anton Pavlovich Chekhov: concern, fatigue, compassion, and pain glimmer there. 

One would hope to find such eyes on a doctor, as well as on a playwright and story writer. 

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Who's Reading What? with Ian Weir

To celebrate the summer of 2017, we are pleased to present an ongoing series of reading recommendations/reminiscences by Goose Lane authors past and present.
Today: Ian Weir (Will Starling)

The sale of souls to the devil seems to have shaped up as the dominant theme in my summer reading. This wasn’t exactly intentional, but here we seem to be.

Each summer I vow to read at least one or two of the books that are so classic that I’m humiliated to admit that I’ve never read them. Don’t ask me about War and Peace, okay? Maybe next summer.

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Painting, movies, and painting in movies

On the face of it, the arts of painting and filmmaking should make for sterling cinematic pairings. Both are primarily visual mediums, after all, and film can be used to capture not only the finished product, but the actions that went into creation. It certainly should work better than, say, the craft of writing, a solitary art that offers little in the way of kinetic energy to translate to a moving picture.

Why, then, do so few movies accurately capture the craft of painting?

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This week in news, from a bookish perspective

We're (meaning Goose Lane) Number One! Rave reviews this week for Lori McNulty's Life on Mars (Publishers Weekly and Buried in Print), Robert Clark's Down Inside (Publishers Weekly), Don McKay's Angular Unconformity, Collected Poems 1970-2014 (Today's Book of Poetry), and Heather Igloliorte's SakKijâjuk: The Art and Craft of Nunatsiavut (National Gallery of Canada)

We're (meaning Canada) Number One! One True Summer, an award-winning graphic novel by Canadian artist Mariko Tamaki, earns the number one spot on the American Library Association’s 2016 list of “banned and challenged books” (The Ottawa Citizen)

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Who's Reading What? with Darryl Whetter

I certainly don’t feel that summer reading is or should be ‘lighter’ than other reading, though I have been seasonally-inspired in the last few years to prefer a good door-stopping novel from late November into December as we Canadians watch the sunlight slink away. Reading should always be pleasurable, not just in summer. Although generally suspect of nostalgia, I do have one regret about summer reading (or, more properly, its demise). Our collective shift into absolutely ubiquitous wireless coverage and cellphone use means that only those wealthy or rural enough to enjoy physical isolation can any longer associate reading on a beach or dock with just the sounds of water, ice cubes and pages turning. 
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