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Tagged "Goose Lane Editions"


Slow Seconds 101

George Thomas Taylor (1838-1913) was a Fredericton-born photographer whose work offers a fascinating glance into nineteenth-century New Brunswick. For the first time ever, a curated collection of his photos will be represented in a book to be published September 24th. Here is a great introductory course on Ronald Rees and Joshua Green's Slow Seconds: The Photography of George Thomas Taylor.
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I Know What I Read This Summer: An Intern's Journey

by Meaghan Laaper 

A friend of mine recently asked me how my internship at Goose Lane Editions was going and I told them, "I think the whole publishing world is absolute whack. And I love it."

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The Great Trees of NB 101

New Brunswick is home to more than five billion trees, many native to the Acadian forest and some exotics introduced by settlers. For this new edition of The Great Trees of New Brunswick (the first edition was published in 1987), forester David Palmer and conservationist Tracy Glynn have prepared a book that doubles as an informative guide to the province’s native and introduced species and a compendium of “champion” trees, drawn from nominations from all corners of the province.

As of January 2018, 50 of the original 52 trees were accounted for. Of the 50 trees, 27 were still alive, 19 were gone, and the status of 4 trees was uncertain.

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The M Word 101

Mother’s Day approaches and brings with it many dimensions, and what book would be better to ring in this year than The M Word: Conversations About Motherhood? Five years after its publication date and editor Kerry Clare is still really proud of this book.

We caught up with her to discuss the stories and ideas that make this book not just relevant, but a must-read for anyone who wonders about motherhood.

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"Dangerous Enemy Sympathizers" 101

May 7th is the official publishing date for "Dangerous Enemy Sympathizers"

When we think of World War II, we think of Nazis, Pearl Harbor, Vimy Ridge, and other iconic images that have been passed down through the generations in Canada. What we don’t always acknowledge are the internment of Japanese Canadians, sympathizers, and those who opposed the war effort. Canada’s self-identity tends to be absolved of guilt.

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